ACCENT TRAINING & PHONETICS

British , American , Australian and then Indian accent,however, something which is understood globally is known as a "Neutral Accent"

So let's try our best to work on this !! And remember "Practice Pays"

ACCENT is important not only for Clarity of Expression but also to ensure you leave a lasting impression. Your listeners will definitely admire the way you speak. If your choice of words, Pronunciation style and accent are reflective.


Not only You can be confident while giving interviews but also , you'll end up developing your personality.
Now , we'll head on in our path to succeed for our speech enhancement Step - by - step


1) Neutral Accent - Learning sounds for mouth exercises

2) Vowel sounds and exercises

3) Pronunciation of Sounds


Can a person Learn New ACCENT

Yes , Obviously ..... we can change the accent

The following are some of the difficulties to be overcome by the ESL speakers

1) Presence of harder sounds ( t,d,p )

2) In distinctive b, v, w sounds and not fully articulated T, R , O , L , I sounds

3) Difficulty in changing pitch (because Americans raise the pitch on the beat but Indians drop their pitch on the beat )

4) Regressive Vocalization of final consonants

5) Articulation of sounds in Indian Languages is frontal and through rounded lips

6) Faster speed - 220 words per minute

7) Weak word emphasis, Intonation and pronunciation on English words and phrases. This could be due to faster rate of speech and there being no stress in Languages here in INDIA

8) Long sentences and words used

9) Different of Syllable emphasis
Listening to English is also good for pronunciation. And one of the things we often worry about is how we sound in the foreign language, whether our accent is a good one or not. So I used to listen to the podcast and I would try to imitate the person who I thought sounded good to me. I didn’t know initially if this was a good accent or a bad accent but after time I got used to it, and I would typically choose the one I could understand the most. From that, I would play small sections of the podcast back to myself and I would try to copy the accent of the speaker. Sometimes, it was difficult and I would do this very often in private because it was quite embarrassing to sit and make funny sounds. Sometimes, I even used to look in the mirror, so that I could see my mouth moving.

All of these things helped me not only improve my listening skills but helped me with my pronunciation and my confidence in listening to the foreign language. And I soon got used to the idea that even if there was a particular word I didn’t understand or an expression I’d never heard before, I could more or less understand all the important things in the story. And because it was a topic that I had chosen, it was always interesting to me.


Fluency


The main goal is fluency. Remember that you don't have to know many complex grammatical structures to achieve that goal! First of all try to speak as fluent as possible (even making some grammar mistakes). Then, after making your speaking fluent, you can focus on grammar aspects.

English vocabulary learning

Many people think that knowing a lot of words is a key to fluent speaking. It's true! However, there are many people who have wide idiolect and problem with fluency. They try to learn more and more words because they think vocabulary is their problem. They don't realize the problem is somewhere else. They always try to use exact translation of the word they want to use, but it causes that they often get stuck.

Learn English by practice

Of course the best way of practice are English conversations with other people. You can find some people who want to talk to you online through SKYPE.(Download Skype 4.2)

So the most important thing you have to remember is:

The more you practice, the more fluent your English speaking is :)

Good luck!

How to learn English

1. Motivation: Become a person who likes to learn English.
2. Dictionary: Get a good English dictionary.
3. No mistakes: Avoid mistakes. Try to use correct English from the beginning.
4. Pronunciation: Learn to pronounce English sounds. Learn to understand phonetic transcription and the phonetic alphabet.
5. Input: Get English into your head by reading and listening to lots of English sentences.


    * Reading
    * Movies 


Motivation for learning English


* What is necessary to learn English well? You have to change your life a little — do crazy things like talking to yourself in English or spending your evening reading a dictionary. In order to do these things, and do them regularly, you have to enjoy doing them. If you are like most learners and don't feel like doing these things, you will have to work on your motivation.
    * Improving your motivation for learning English: We share our psychological tricks that helped us enjoy learning English and that you can use to boost your motivation and make a difference in your English.


Learning to pronounce the sounds of English


English uses different sounds than other languages. For example, the first sound in the word thin and the first sound in the word away are never heard in many languages.


Therefore, you have to:


   1. know all the English sounds
   2. listen to how they sound in real words and sentences
   3. practice your pronunciation — listen to English words and sentences, and try to repeat them as well as you can


Learning tips


    * It's not so important to spend a lot of time practicing; it's more important to do it regularly. In my experience, instead of practicing for three hours, it is better to practice for one hour and then start again the next day after a good night's sleep. You cannot rush things. Your brain needs time (and sleep) to get used to the new sounds.
    * Not all English sounds require hours of practice. You can improve in many areas just by being more careful. If you just focus on the way you pronounce the r sound or the z in words like is and runs, your English will sound much better.
    * When listening to native speakers (watching TV, watching a movie, listening to an audiobook, etc.), always pay attention to the sounds they pronounce. Try to imitate them.
    * You should try to pronounce English words whenever you're alone with a little time to spare, e.g. while waiting for the bus, taking a shower, or surfing the Web.
    * You will need at least some talent for imitating sounds (for instance, if you can imitate people in your own language, it should be easy for you to imitate English pronunciation as well). However, if you don't have these skills, you can achieve a lot with persistence and a little technology. One helpful technique is to record your voice and compare it with the correct pronunciation. This way, you can see where your pronunciation is different from the original and you can gradually make it more native-like.
    * Find someone who speaks your native language with a British or American accent. Try to imitate the way he/she speaks your native language. It will help you see the differences between the sounds of English and your native language. You may also be able to imitate the pronunciation and other qualities of speech more easily. (See this article and this forum topic.)
    * Check out online resources for practicing English sounds: Rachel's English (American), Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary (American) and BBC Learning English (British). These sites allow you to listen to each sound pronounced clearly in many words. Rachel's English and the Merriam-Webster site also have videos which show you the proper position of the mouth and tongue. (I have never found these anatomical details helpful, but your mileage may vary.)


How to learn English pronunciation?


   1. Learn about the sounds of English and their IPA symbols from our chart with audio recordings.
   2. Learn about phonetic transcription and word stress.
   3. Choose your pronunciation model: American or British.
   4. Learn to pronounce all the English sounds by listening, paying attention to pronunciation, and repeating, repeating, repeating...
   5. Learn the pronunciation of every English word that you use. You can find phonetic transcriptions of words in good English dictionaries.



Choosing between American and British pronunciation

Different kinds of English have different pronunciation. For example, the pronunciation (the accent) of British English is different from the pronunciation of American English.

The most frequently learned kinds of English in the world are American English and British English.

American pronunciation

In the context of language learning, American pronunciation means General American (GenAm) pronunciation. This is the pronunciation used by educated Americans, on television and on radio. It is described in dictionaries of American English, such as the Merriam-Webster and Random House dictionaries.

Most Americans and Canadians speak something similar to General American. Whether you're in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle or Toronto, you will generally hear the same accent. There are some regional differences, but they are usually very small. The only major exception is the South of the US (especially outside of big cities), which has its own distinct accent.

General American pronunciation is rhotic, which means that the letter r is always pronounced.

British pronunciation

When people talk about learning British pronunciation, they usually think of Received Pronunciation (RP). This is the pronunciation that you will learn at a British language school; it is also the model taught in coursebooks and dictionaries from publishers like Oxford and Longman.

In the UK, only a small percentage of people speak something similar to RP. "Normal people" only speak it in the southeast of England — in the area near Oxford, Cambridge, Brighton and London (excluding working-class Londoners, who speak Cockney or Estuary). Elsewhere RP is spoken only by upper-class people, academics, actors, TV personalities, politicians and English teachers.

"Normal" Britons usually speak with their local accents, which are often quite different from RP, and can be very hard to understand to untrained ears. Sometimes cities that are only 20 km apart have very different accents. (The British Library has an interactive map of the UK which lets you listen to some examples of British accents from various areas.)

RP is non-rhotic, which means that the letter r is usually "silent", unless it is followed by a vowel. Here's how it works:

    * In words like car, tower, inform and first, r is silent (r is not followed by a vowel).
    * In words like red, foreign, print, r is pronounced (r is followed by a vowel).
    * R is also pronounced at the end of a word, if the next word starts with a vowel, for example: number eight, far away.
    * Most RP speakers also insert an r in phrases like: the idea(r) of, Africa(r) and Asia, law(r) and order. This r is not in the spelling; they just use it to separate two vowels.

The following pairs sound exactly the same in RP: or/awe, court/caught, sore/saw, farther/father, formerly/formally. In General American, they all sound different.
Which one should you choose?

To choose between American and British pronunciation, you need to answer two questions:

   1. which one will be more useful to you?
   2. which one will be easier to learn for you?

On the first question, you should remember that whether you choose General American or RP, you will be understood by all English speakers, because everyone familiar with both of these accents from TV and movies. So the objective usefulness of GenAm and RP is about the same. Still, if you know you're going to be talking mainly to people who have a particular accent, you may want to learn a similar accent (or you may decide that it is better to stand out).

For example, if you are planning to move to England, or if you have many English friends, you may want to learn RP. Of course, the accent of most Britons is quite different from RP, so you will probably stand out anyway. (Speakers of GenAm will have a much better chance of blending in with Americans, as there are fewer regional differences in the US.)

The second question is more tricky. Here, the most important thing are your individual circumstances, such as:

    * Whether you simply prefer one of the accents (for example, because it sounds more pleasant, more sexy, more intelligent, more powerful, etc. to you). If you want to get results, you have to be excited about learning English pronunciation. The more attractive your goal seems to you, the more motivation you will have.
    * Which accent you find easier to imitate. Sometimes people find they have a knack for one, but not the other.
    * Which accent your friends are learning. It is easier to learn if you can talk things through with your friends.
    * Which accent your teacher speaks. (Same reason as above.)
    * Whether you are interested in science or computing. GenAm is more frequently used in those fields and if you are interested in them, you will hear it more often and will find it easier to learn.

If the above questions don't point to an obvious choice, take a look at this table, which compares the more objective advantages of each accent:

Choosing between American and British pronunciation


Different kinds of English have different pronunciation. For example, the pronunciation (the accent) of British English is different from the pronunciation of American English.

The most frequently learned kinds of English in the world are American English and British English.
Sample recordings of General American (GenAm) pronunciation
American pronunciation

In the context of language learning, American pronunciation means General American (GenAm) pronunciation. This is the pronunciation used by educated Americans, on television and on radio. It is described in dictionaries of American English, such as the Merriam-Webster and Random House dictionaries.

Most Americans and Canadians speak something similar to General American. Whether you're in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Seattle or Toronto, you will generally hear the same accent. There are some regional differences, but they are usually very small. The only major exception is the South of the US (especially outside of big cities), which has its own distinct accent.

General American pronunciation is rhotic, which means that the letter r is always pronounced.
Sample recordings of British pronunciation (RP)
British pronunciation

When people talk about learning British pronunciation, they usually think of Received Pronunciation (RP). This is the pronunciation that you will learn at a British language school; it is also the model taught in coursebooks and dictionaries from publishers like Oxford and Longman.

In the UK, only a small percentage of people speak something similar to RP. "Normal people" only speak it in the southeast of England — in the area near Oxford, Cambridge, Brighton and London (excluding working-class Londoners, who speak Cockney or Estuary). Elsewhere RP is spoken only by upper-class people, academics, actors, TV personalities, politicians and English teachers.

"Normal" Britons usually speak with their local accents, which are often quite different from RP, and can be very hard to understand to untrained ears. Sometimes cities that are only 20 km apart have very different accents. (The British Library has an interactive map of the UK which lets you listen to some examples of British accents from various areas.)

RP is non-rhotic, which means that the letter r is usually "silent", unless it is followed by a vowel. Here's how it works:

    * In words like car, tower, inform and first, r is silent (r is not followed by a vowel).
    * In words like red, foreign, print, r is pronounced (r is followed by a vowel).
    * R is also pronounced at the end of a word, if the next word starts with a vowel, for example: number eight, far away.
    * Most RP speakers also insert an r in phrases like: the idea(r) of, Africa(r) and Asia, law(r) and order. This r is not in the spelling; they just use it to separate two vowels.

The following pairs sound exactly the same in RP: or/awe, court/caught, sore/saw, farther/father, formerly/formally. In General American, they all sound different.
Which one should you choose?

To choose between American and British pronunciation, you need to answer two questions:

   1. which one will be more useful to you?
   2. which one will be easier to learn for you?

On the first question, you should remember that whether you choose General American or RP, you will be understood by all English speakers, because everyone familiar with both of these accents from TV and movies. So the objective usefulness of GenAm and RP is about the same. Still, if you know you're going to be talking mainly to people who have a particular accent, you may want to learn a similar accent (or you may decide that it is better to stand out).

For example, if you are planning to move to England, or if you have many English friends, you may want to learn RP. Of course, the accent of most Britons is quite different from RP, so you will probably stand out anyway. (Speakers of GenAm will have a much better chance of blending in with Americans, as there are fewer regional differences in the US.)

The second question is more tricky. Here, the most important thing are your individual circumstances, such as:

    * Whether you simply prefer one of the accents (for example, because it sounds more pleasant, more sexy, more intelligent, more powerful, etc. to you). If you want to get results, you have to be excited about learning English pronunciation. The more attractive your goal seems to you, the more motivation you will have.
    * Which accent you find easier to imitate. Sometimes people find they have a knack for one, but not the other.
    * Which accent your friends are learning. It is easier to learn if you can talk things through with your friends.
    * Which accent your teacher speaks. (Same reason as above.)
    * Whether you are interested in science or computing. GenAm is more frequently used in those fields and if you are interested in them, you will hear it more often and will find it easier to learn.

If the above questions don't point to an obvious choice, take a look at this table, which compares the more objective advantages of each accent:
US flagGeneral American (GenAm) UK flagReceived Pronunciation (RP)

    * If you speak it, you will be understood by all English speakers.




    * If you speak it, you will be understood by all English speakers.

    * You have a better choice of movies, TV shows and video games to learn the accent from. America's media industry makes a larger amount of interesting, funny and exciting content than Britain's.

    * Although American English dominates the media, there are plenty of well-known British actors and movies full of British pronunciation (Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings).

    * The Web has more GenAm content (YouTube videos, podcasts, etc.) than RP content.

    * There are at least 10 times more speakers of GenAm than of RP. If you have pronunciation questions, it is easier to find a speaker of GenAm (or something close to GenAm) than of RP.

    * The best English dictionaries are made in Britain and focus on RP. (They also have information on American pronunciation, but it is not always accurate, so if you choose American English, you will have to consult American dictionaries, too.)

    * People in Britain are neutral towards speakers of American English.

    * Americans love RP. If you speak RP in America, people will think you are intelligent and the opposite sex will take more interest in you.

My choice of General American pronunciation

My reasons for choosing American pronunciation were personal. I wanted to learn the same kind of English as my two best friends in high school, who were also the best English learners. I also wanted to be different from "average" students (most people in Poland try to learn RP), and I wanted to annoy my teachers, many of whom viewed RP as some kind of "gold standard". If I had been studying RP, I simply would not have had so much fun on a social level.

Even though my reasons were personal, American English turned out to be a good choice. RP may be the king of schools, coursebooks and dictionaries, but most popular, real-world content (movies, TV series, podcasts, Web videos, etc.) features American speakers. Because I was learning American English, I could practice my pronunciation while watching my favorite TV shows and playing my favorite video games. If I had chosen RP, I would have still had some fun content to learn from, but my options would have been more limited.
The importance of learning about the other accent

Whichever accent you choose, you should have some knowledge about both accents. Let's suppose you want to speak pure RP. You don't want to have an American accent at all. Should you pay attention to the American pronunciations in your dictionary?

Yes, you should. First of all, you need to understand both British and American English, since both are widely used. Even if you want to speak RP, it is good to know how words are pronounced in General American. It helps you understand American speech.

Secondly, you ought to be aware of the systematic differences between RP and GenAm because you will be learning words from Americans as well as Britons. Consider what happens if you (a student of RP) hear a new English word on an American TV channel. Let's suppose this word is nuke, pronounced /nu:k/. If you know nothing about American pronunciation, you may assume that the word is pronounced the same way in RP, and you may learn to say it like that.

However, if you had some basic knowledge of American phonetics, you would know that many words which have the sound /ju:/ in RP, have /u:/ in GenAm (for example: new, due). Because nuke is one of such words, the pronunciation /nu:k/ is not correct in RP. The correct pronunciation is /nju:k/.

If you pay attention to both British and American pronunciations in your dictionary, you will eventually develop a type of intuition about these things. For most words, you'll be able to tell how to pronounce them in your accent, even if you have only heard them from speakers of the other accent. For other words, you'll know that you just have to look them up to be sure.

(This topic has been discussed in the Forum.)
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Always Speak Slowly [it doesn't matter whether its American English or British English]

If you have an accent when you speak English, then slowing down your rate will give you more time to get your tongue and lips into the correct place to form sounds. When you pronounce sounds correctly, your accent will naturally decrease. This means that speaking more quickly will give you less time to think about how to form sounds and will result in a heavier accent. The goal is not to speak TOO slowly, but to speak slowly enough so that you can speak clearly and be easily understood.

Every Human Being MUST watch this video

Nick Vujicic and his attitude serve as a great examples of the celebration of life over limitations.

The human spirit can handle much more than we realize.

"I LOVE LIVING LIFE. I AM HAPPY."... See More

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Think you've got it bad?
Need some encouragement?
Fallen down?
Can't find the STRENGTH to get back up?

Watch this video. It will help. Then share it with others.

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"If I fail, I try again, and again, and again..."
If YOU fail, are YOU going to try again?

It matters how you're going to FINISH...
Are you going to finish STRONG?

We are put in situations to build our character... not destroy us.

The tensions in our life are there to strengthen our convictions... not to run over us.

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Nick is thankful for what he HAS.
He's not bitter for what he does NOT have.

I have never met a bitter person who was thankful.
I have never met a thankful person who was bitter.

In life you have a choice: Bitter or BETTER?

...........................

yes this is not the End!! Never GIVE UP


never-give-up

By THOMAS GB

I love GOA

I love GOA

All Rights Received ( THOMAS GB )

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